Episode 27: That Waltz

Waltz in C-sharp minor, Op. 64, No. 2

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When you think of Chopin, what piece first comes to mind?

The Nocturne, Op. 9, No. 2?

The Revolutionary Etude?

How about that Waltz? You know, THAT one, the Waltz in C-sharp minor, Op. 64, No. 2.

Artur Rubinstein was one of the great Chopin interpreters of all time, known for his definitive performances of the Polish master. But "definitive" in the case of THIS waltz is in the ear of the beholder. Any casual visitor to the wild meadow of YouTube will discover a wealth of Chopin Waltz varietals. Here's Rubinstein:

Then there's Vladimir Horowitz at the White House.

Sergei Rachmaninoff in 1917.

Child prodigy Yujia Wang at the age of 11.

Jazz piano legend Art Tatum.

Countless amateurs on big grands, electric keyboards in the den, uprights in the living room. Or even on the guitar.

What is it about THIS Waltz by Chopin? Artur Rubinstein said it best. When people asked him how he could continue to play the same Waltz for more than 75 years, he replied, "because it's not the same, and I don't play it the same way." - Benjamin K. Roe

Radio Chopin Episode 27: That Waltz



Waltz in C-sharp minor, Op. 64, No. 2